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Our first impression of Tableau – intuitive, powerful, beautiful

#PowerBI experts, Crush on #Tableau

Power BI and Tableau has been ranked as leaders in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Analytics and BI 2020. It becomes critical for businesses to choose between one of these solutions for their analytics and BI workloads.

Of late, we have been receiving a lot of questions and interests in choosing BI tools. Recent trends show that companies are open to Power BI or Tableau as long as their needs are met within budget.


We are open to choosing and suggesting BI tools to our customers. We decided to give a try to Tableau.

Our first impression of Tableau

Tableau is intuitive. Tableau is quick. Table is powerful. Tableau is beautiful.

Tableau’s power is its data visualization capabilities.

You need a dual axis chart with bars and lines? You got it.

You need a dumbell chart? You got it.

You need advanced analytics? You need greater control over tooltips? You need annotations?

You got it!

Looks like Tableau was built ground up with data visualization in mind. And, it’s correct. Tableau founders were from graphics and visualization background.


How does it compare with Power BI?

After our hands on with Tableau we can say Power BI visualization capabilities though familiar, are limited. You have the same decade and century old charts.

You can be creative with visuals but then you need to learn Typescript and Node.js. You can create new and advanced charts but development and learning curve is high.

How about modelling capabilities?

Power BI excels in data modelling capabilities. DAX and multi-dimensional concepts are inbuilt in Power BI.

Tableau lacks much of these. Minimal multi-dimensional support, no functional language like DAX. Tableau relies on calculation scripts, LOD etc.

How about Dashboards and Reports on canvas?

Tableau has concept of Sheets and Dashboards. Power BI has concept of Reports and Dashboards.

We feel Power BI wins here as you have greater control over the layout and structure of your reports. You can create Business dashboards quite easily in Power BI.

What about Publishing options?

With Tableau you can publish to a Tableau server or Tableau online. Same with Power BI.

However, Power BI service (or Power BI online) though looks cluttered sometimes, is quite powerful and feature rich. Navigation can be confusing. It has a concept of workspaces.

Tableau online is clean and has simple interface. Admin capabilities and options look limited. It has a concept of projects. Great UX.

What about cost?

To a large extent Power BI wins here. Power BI Desktop is free. Power BI Online is free for personal use. This makes Power BI quicker to adopt and penetrate within your org.

Tableau unfortunately is not free. It’s costlier than Power BI. Though Tableau has a free version called Tableau Public, its functionality is limited.

Note: We need to evaluate cost in a larger scheme of things keeping view of number of creators, number frequent and occasional users.

How is the support for developer tools?

Microsoft is known for developing products for extensibility. Power BI wins here with APIs to manage everything you need. Power BI lacks APIs for designer and modifying models.

Tableau has some support for tools but it’s limited.

What do you recommend?

Power BI and Tableau, both are great tools. However, recent job trend shows greater demand for Power BI developers.

To sum up: Power BI is a great end to end BI tool. Tableau is a great visualization tool.

We recommend to check your existing BI investments, and BI and analytics needs. Based on this and your budget, take a call.


Given high demand for both the tools, we are working on creating a comprehensive guide comparing Power BI and Tableau. We will cover in detail their BI capabilities, Data Integrations, Enterprise support, APIs and costs with screenshots from both the tools.

Join our list to be the first one to know when the guide is available.

Do you want us to evaluate which BI tools fit your business needs? Contact us now.

Gartner Magic Quadrant for Analytics and BI Platforms 2020

Business Intelligence tools have been in market since years. What has now started differentiating them is:

  1. Support for Enterprise reporting needs – large datasets, on-prem and cloud, data governance, security, agile dev cycle
  2. Augmented analytics capabilities – Machine Learning capabilities and AI assisted insights generation and explanation

This Magic Quadrant will help data and analytics leaders complement their existing solutions or move to an entirely new vendor.

Directly from Gartner:

Augmented capabilities are becoming key differentiators for analytics and BI platforms, at a time when cloud ecosystems are also influencing selection decisions

Here’s what Gartner Analysts think in terms of numbers:

By 2022, augmented analytics technology will be ubiquitous, but only 10% of analysts will use its full potential.

By 2022, 40% of machine learning model development and scoring will be done in products that do not have machine learning as their primary goal.

By 2023, 90% the world’s top 500 companies will have converged analytics governance into broader data and analytics governance initiatives.

By 2025, 80% of consumer or industrial products containing electronics will incorporate on-device analytics.

By 2025, data stories will be the most widespread way of consuming analytics, and 75% of stories will be automatically generated using augmented analytics techniques.


Here’s presenting the 2020 Magic Quadrant for Analytics and Business Intelligence Platforms.

Magic Quadrant for Analytics and Business Intelligence Platforms
Magic Quadrant for Analytics and Business Intelligence Platforms – 2020

Microsoft (Power BI), Tableau, Qlik and ThoughtSpot are leaders in this space. How did this look like last year?

Magic Quadrant for Analytics and Business Intelligence Platforms – 2019

How about 2015 vs 2020? Lot has changed since then. The Leaders space was crowded back then.

Magic Quadrant for BI tools – 2015

Here’s the direct link to the full report on Gartner’s site with each vendors strengths and cautions in detail along with 15 Critical Capabilities of an Analytics and BI Platform.


For 13 consecutive years, Gartner has recognized Microsoft as a Magic Quadrant Leader in analytics and business intelligence platforms. When they reference Microsoft, they are referencing to the Power BI platform.

Looking to adopt Power BI in your organization? Contact us for a free consultation on how Power BI can help you realize your modern BI vision.

Get in touch now!

Power BI Premium or Power BI Pro – the answer is here!

Power BI comes with multiple licensing model

  1. Power BI Pro
  2. Power BI Premium
  3. Power BI Embedded
  4. Power BI Free

In this post we will cover Power BI Pro and Power BI Premium licensing model.

Which licensing model to go with is determined by following three factors:

  1. Cost
  2. Number of users (creators, viewers, occasional viewers)
  3. Features required

The first two factors are the most critical in deciding the licensing model.

It’s a choice between multiple Pro licenses or multiple Premium licenses.

A Power BI Pro is a per user license currently costing around $10 per user per month, while Power BI Premium is a capacity license currently costing around $5000 per capacity node per month.

Yes, the cost difference is huge. But, wait, there are lots of things hidden in that $5000.

  1. Power BI Premium is a capacity license. It can support 450 users report viewing needs (see example below)
  2. Power BI Premium is for content consumption rather than content creation
  3. Large number of external readers (out of org users with no Power BI license)
  4. AI, Paginated reports, XMLA read/write and many other features

What does that mean?

If you want to create, author and publish reports, you definitely need Power BI Pro licenses. You cannot go away with that. Whether to go with Power BI Premium or not, it depends.

Say, if you have 500 users in your org and out of 500 users

  1. 50 users will be creating content
  2. 200 users will be frequently accessing the content
  3. 250 users will be occasionally accessing the content

Then, you require

  1. 50 Power BI Pro licenses
  2. 1 Premium capacity node

With the premium capacity node we can serve the “consumption” needs for 450 users.

How did we come up with that conclusion? A simple Power BI Premium calculator is available to help us decide number of licenses (link below).

But, say your org has 100 users with 50 creating content and 50 viewing, it’s recommended to go with 100 Pro licenses (total cost $1000 per month) than a premium capacity node unless you need additional features like AI, external readers etc.


Power BI Premium vs Power BI Pro – Which licensing model should I choose? The answer is here!


If you are still not sure of the licensing model or worst, if you are not sure if Power BI is fit for your organization’s BI needs then you may request a free consultation.

You may fill the form below or directly setup a call

Or, fill up this form and we will get back to you with time slots within 12-24 business hours.

Notes:

Power BI Premium Calculator: https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/calculator/

Power BI premium also comes with additional feature sets including AI, Incremental refresh, Power BI Report Server, Paginated (SSRS types) reports, XMLA read/write and others – or better to say Enterprise features.

If you need a quick comparison between Power BI Pro and Power BI Premium feature sets, please check this table provided by Microsoft. (Click the image to view the entire table)

https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/pricing/#powerbi-comparison-table

Power BI Features End to End

Ever imagined if you could get to see all the amazing Power BI Features in one shot? Power BI is not just one product. It’s a suite of products.

  • What data sources are supported in Power BI?
  • What content authoring capabilities it has?
  • What about content delivery and distribution capabilities?
  • What about data governance and administration?

Check this image to view end to end picture of Power BI!

Thanks to Coates Data Strategies for compiling this.

12 sales metrics you need to track

One of the most important question when running a business is: Which metrics should I track?

Whether it’s about team performance, or pipeline performance, or competitor or product performance, it all takes a few metrics to keep track to ensure business visibility.


How quickly will I achieve my goals?

Do I need to speed up my sales process?

Is their a team which needs more attention?

Is their an account that I’m losing?

Are we improving?


Metrics should be shown on a dashboard, big and visible! It can be shown on a TV or big displays.


So, here are 12 sales metrics that you need to show on your Sales dashboard.

Image source: SalesForce.com

Metrics include: Lead by source, Pipeline, Sales cycle, Closed opportunities, New business vs. upsell, Win/loss rate, Product gaps, Open opportunities, Open activities, Open cases, Opportunities past due and Sales by closed date.

Only 12 metrics and you are done with your sales tracking!

But,

Which tool should I use?

How do I extract the data?

How do I plot these?

Which visuals should I use?

How should I show sales deal stage funnel?

You will be amazed to see how the metrics have been placed with the right choice of visuals and the layout in this Power BI report developed by us using HubSpot CRM data.

Sales Dashboard in Power BI using HubSpot data

If you see the report here it is divided into several views:

  1. Overview report – Shows your key metrics and sales funnel. Here we track open revenue, deal owners, sales cycle time along with deal details
  2. Deal Geo analysis – Here you can clearly identify Asian regions not performing well with won rate less than 30%
  3. Deal Region analysis – Imagine an executive interested in Region level performance? This view gives a clear picture where his team needs to focus
  4. Deal Details report – Last but not the least, a detailed report to call out specific deals and work with the account owners to understand progress

The CRM source could be HubSpot, SalesForce or even Microsoft Dynamics.

The tool we have used is Microsoft Power BI to pull, model and visualize raw data.

Interested in viewing the live Power BI report?


Image source and inspiration: Sales Force